Signs Your Sewer Is Being Invaded By Tree Roots

Tree root intrusion is a common issue for many Toronto Homeowners, let's lit the light on the facts.
Every homeowner dreams of filling their yard with beautiful, mature trees that offer shade in summer while displaying stunning colors in the fall. While trees are a welcome addition to the landscape, they can sometimes be the 'root' cause of other problems!
While many homeowners know the importance of keeping the tree branches trimmed, they may be unaware that root growth can be equally, if not more, dangerous. Unchecked tree root intrusion can translate into serious trouble for your home's plumbing leading to drain blockage.

Tree roots grew into the main drain line; formed a blockage in the drain pipe ,and caused basement drain to back up.
How does tree root intrusion impact plumbing?

Trees need nourishment to thrive, and the feeder roots seek the nutrients and water from the soil. The underground sewer that carries water or moisture invites the tree roots which tend to grow wherever the nutrients are available. Feeder roots can enter the tiniest of holes or cracks in the pipes and eventually block the drainage system.

Root hairs grow into water mains as well in search of water. This process can speed up during winters when the tree may not get the required amount of moisture that is available in summer months. When the sewer line is cracked, it causes sewage and water to leak into the soil providing the ideal mix of organic materials including water, oxygen and other nutrients essential for the growth of tree roots.

Root invasion is common in older pipes made of concrete or clay or the ones which have more cracks. While PVC pipes are less prone to tree root invasion, they can be at times chewed up by rodents or pests, making them vulnerable to blocks. The risk of tree root invasion is higher when there are more joints and longer lines in the sewer and with fast-growing, more giant trees. As the tree roots expand, immense pressure is built up within the drain which is powerful enough to cause the most dense and tightest of pipe connections to break.

How to detect if your sewer has tree root invasion?

Some of the earliest signs of tree root invasion include:
- Unexplained, frequent blocks in sinks, toilets or tubs
- Your toilets could be only partially flushing, or you could notice regular sewage back up after flushing.
- Gurgling sounds in the plumbing system
- While slow drainage that may initially be noticed in just one or two drains could be related to the drainage issues, sluggish drainage in all the outlets is typically associated with tree root intrusion.
- Unpleasant odor that is emanating from toilets or drains indicates drain blockage where the sewage is remaining in pipes instead of being drained out.

How does the professional emergency plumber diagnose tree root invasion?

If you are experiencing any of the above problems, calling in the emergency plumber is crucial. The competent professional employs drain camera inspection to visualize tree roots in the sewer line while evaluating how serious the issue is.
The drain camera captures video footage to clearly show where the tree roots are impacting the sewer. The professional emergency plumber then carries out emergency drain cleaning using cutting edge techniques such as hydro jetting, pipe relining, pipe replacement and herbicides to flush out tree roots.
5/10/2019